Hubert Harrison Urges Self-Defense In Harlem, July 4, 1917

hubert harrison in harlemBy Jeffrey B. Perry

On July 4, 1917, The Voice: A Newspaper for the New Negro—the first newspaper of the “New Negro Movement,” edited by Hubert H. Harrison—made its debut at a rally at the Metropolitan Baptist Church at 120 W. 138th Street (we have the address at 151 W 128th Street), between Lenox and Seventh Avenues in Harlem.

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The Lexington Avenue Explosion In Harlem, July 4, 1914

Caron_bomb in harlemThe Lexington Avenue explosion was the July 4, 1914 explosion of a bomb in an apartment at 1626 Lexington Avenue in New York City, killing four people and injuring dozens.  Continue Reading →

Harlem’s Samuel Jesse Battle, A Career Of Firsts

samuel jSamuel Jesse Battle (born January 16, 1883 in New Bern, North Carolina). His parents were among the last generation born into Southern slavery, and his own birth in 1883 was notable for another benchmark: At 16 pounds, he was the biggest baby ever recorded in North Carolina. Continue Reading →

Duke Ellington And The Harlem Renaissance, 1930’s

duke ellingtonA photograph of the very elegant of Duke Ellington, in this charming signed image reads in his personal inscription, “to the Most Charming Miss Alice Dixon Best Wishes Duke Ellington”, 1930’s. Continue Reading →

HW Pick: Is Preservation Elitist?

IsPreservationElitist_HeroWhile many of New York’s designated historic districts are known for their grand architecture (such as Brooklyn Heights and the Upper East Side), an increasing number of others – including Tin Pan Alley, Flushing, Weeksville, and Chinatown– are famed for their distinctive cultural character.  Continue Reading →

HW Pick: New York City’s Slave Market

indexOn a recent NYPL blog post it stated that on June 27, a plaque marking the site of New York City’s main 18th-century slave market was unveiled in Lower Manhattan by Mayor Bill de Blasio. Continue Reading →

The Amazing Story Of Harlem’s Esther Jones (videos)

baby esther by James VanDerZeeWe originally ran story about The Story Of Harlem’s Baby “Betty Boop” Esther afew days ago and received a number of emails asking if she was the original “Betty Boop” voice. We found this story that sounds very similar to the Little Richard story, where talent is not being paid for the content that they originated. The post has been edited for this posting:

Esther Jones is a singer who was known by her stage name, “Baby Esther.” Baby Esther was a popular entertainer at Harlem’s Cotton Club in the late 1920s. Baby Esther interpolated words such as ‘Boo-Boo-Boo’ & ‘Doo-Doo-Doo’ in songs at a cabaret.  Continue Reading →

The Most Modern Palm Cafe And Cocktail Lounge, Harlem, 1949 (video)

palm cafeA great image of a damp Harlem with the Apollo, Playland arcade, Harlem Lanes, the Loews Victoria Theater and to the right the ever modern Palm Cafe and Cocktail Lounge at 209 West 125th Street in Harlem USA, New York.

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