‘An American Drum Circle’ Is An Endearing E-Mail To All

An American Drum Circle - Kathleen Grace Fiori - Nneoma Nkuku - Photo by Martha Granger sliderBy Dontré L. Conerly

Undoubtedly, you’ve received the following email; we all have:

Addressed to you from an unknown address and source, the author claims to be a citizen of an African nation in a most unfortunate situation:

She has just been bequeathed an extraordinary sum of money (anywhere between $4M to $18M) and is in need of a “reliable” person to help her retrieve it.  After fleeing a war and absconding with this money—concealed in a chest—she needs your help to get it out of her new country and into yours. You simply have to give over vital personal details (such as your bank account info), and pay the associated “fees” to get the money into your hands.

Related: Read more great articles by Dontre Conerly here.

You can see where this is going.  Most people can; and they simple sent this email to the SPAM folder.

An American Drum Circle - Serge Thony - Photo by Martha Granger

But have you ever wondered who falls for such a scam and who are the people behind it?

Both questions are answered by Vanessa Shealy’s new play, An American Drum Circle, playing through May 22, 2016, at The Tabernacle Theater in Northern Manhattan.

Director Melissa Attebery delicately weaves her five-person cast into an sentimental web of humour and heartbreak, as this small-scale production explores how the famed “Nigerian email scam” becomes a reality when paired with the unquestioning faith of a religious man and the strained emotions of his runaway daughter.

An American Drum Circle - Nneoma Nkuku - Photo by Martha Granger

Tired of failed get-rich-quick schemes by her father, “Mandy” seeks a new life in Tulsa, Oklahoma, free from his broken promises and dashed hopes, which would otherwise be the bedrock of the archetypal father-daughter bond. The immature 18-year-old is quickly in over her head when she meets aspiring rapper, “Jimmy” whose smooth words are used to woo more than just the gullible ingénue.

Cutting the apron strings of family pressures in Nigeria and following his dreams in America, “Jimmy” is quickly caught up in Mandy’s heartstrings who, like him, is merely looking for a fresh start. He is quickly ensnared in a tangled mess when loose ends of his double-dealing aren’t properly tied off.

An American Drum Circle - Dennis Fox - Rick Younger - Photo by Martha Granger

It’s said “a sucker is born every minute,” and it seems that clock tolls loudly in America’s Bible Belt, where unquestioned faith leads entire congregations to instill their trusts in the piety of a convincing pilgrim, who is chasing the ultimate scheme to recoup his family and faith.

In what could be a harsh critique of religion and youth, no one seems to listen to reason or common sense, both instilled in “Niecy,” Mandy’s roommate and a member of the congregation who encourages everyone to have open, honest dialogue. They never do.

In the infancy of their relationship, Jimmy explains to Mandy that in some Nigerian tribes, drums are used as a communication device to transmit messages over vast distances.  In Shealy’s ‘Drum Circle,’ the beating of hearts fuels communication which ultimately breaks down when receivers fail to hear the rhythm.

This season opener for UP Theater is poignant and powerful, and—impressively—adds depth to a modern-day joke. The cast of five expertly fill the expansive space spring boarding from one character to the next with stealthy outfit changes, no discernible break in the play’s action or flow. It’s a little play with a big heart that has a vibrant beat.

Get tickets to see An American Drum Circle by clicking HERE.

Photos by Martha-Granger.

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About Dontré Conerly

Dontré Conerly is a freelance multi-media journalist with over a decade of experience. A veritable man-about-town, he reports goings-on for many publications, including World Bride Magazine and HarlemWorld Magazine, most recently. Conerly served as the Arts & Culture Editor of HarlemWorld Magazine and, for a time, its Editor-in-Chief. As the News & Culture Editor for BLEU Magazine, Dontré authored an online column, titled, Entre Nous, where he offered commentary and critique of social and political zeitgeist. His writings have also appeared in Metro and amNY, two of New York City’s most widely-read daily newspapers. Taking his talents to television, Dontré appeared as one of the hosts of BKLIVE! the flagship news broadcast on Brooklyn Independent Media. Conerly received his Masters from the prestigious Newhouse School of Communications at Syracuse University, and a Bachelor of Communications from New York University. A native of New Orleans, LA, he currently resides in historic Harlem, NY.