Display Marks Centennial Of 1917 NAACP “The Negro Silent Protest Parade” Organized In Harlem

The Silent Protest Parade on Fifth Avenue on July 28, 1917, one of the first major mass demonstrations by African Americans, will be the focus of a special display of four historic photographs at the Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library, on view from Friday, July 21, through Sunday, July 30. Continue Reading →

Harlem’s Grace Nail Johnson, Activist, Arts Patron And Wife Of Writer James Weldon Johnson

Grace Nail Johnson, February 27, 1885 – November 1, 1976, was a civil rights activist and patron of the arts, and wife of writer James Weldon Johnson. Continue Reading →

John E. Nail, Harlem Realtor, Organizer And Visionary, 1883 – 1947

John E. (Jack) Nail, 1883 – 1947, was born in New London, Connecticut, and was a successful Harlem, New York realtor. Continue Reading →

Google Celebrates America’s Story, The 100th Anniversary Of “The Negro Silent Protest Parade”

“There was no singing, no chanting — just silence,” read the statement published by Google this morning. Continue Reading →

“The Negro Silent Protest Parade” Formed By Harlem’s St. Philip’s Church, 1917

The march was organized by W. E. B. Du Bois, the NAACP, second vice president of the NAACP, Harlem‘s James Weldon Johnson, and Rev. Hutchens Chew Bishop, rector of St. Philip’s Episcopal Church and realtor John E. Nail in Harlem, on July 28, 1917.

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Harlem Painter, Illustrator And Arts Educator, Aaron Douglas

aaron-douglas1Aaron Douglas May 26, 1899 – February 3, 1979, was an African-American painter, illustrator and arts educator. He was a preiminent figure in the Harlem Renaissance. Continue Reading →

Arnaud “Arna” Wendell Bontemps Harlem NY 1923-1930 (video)

arna bontemps in harlem1Arnaud “Arna” Wendell Bontemps October 13, 1902 – June 4, 1973 was a Harlem poet, novelist and librarian, and a noted member of the Harlem Renaissance.
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An Interview with CUNY’s Dr. Gordon E. Thompson on “The Assimilationist Impulse”

gordon_thomspson_headshotBy Richard-Olivier Marius

A general interest in James Baldwin’s critique of Richard Wright’s “Native Son” inspired Gordon E. Thompson’s text “The Assimilationist Impulse in Four African American Narratives,” (Edwin Mellen Press, 2011). Continue Reading →